Course Content
Advise on literacy demands
1.1 Access nationally recognised training products and analyse their literacy demands using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks 1.2 Analyse literacy demands essential to the workplace context and workplace performance using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks 1.3 Analyse literacy demands of the learning and assessment context using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks 1.4 Share information and provide advice on literacy demands
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Advise on literacy skill support needs of learners
2.1 Collect and analyse information about individual learner and candidate backgrounds to identify strengths and limitations relevant to literacy skill development 2.2 Plan and conduct literacy assessment using validated assessment tasks 2.3 Analyse literacy assessment results using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks to determine literacy skill levels 2.4 Analyse and compare literacy demands and learner literacy skill levels to determine the literacy skill support needs 2.5 Share information and provide advice on literacy skill assessment, levels and support needs
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Advise on literacy skill development
3.1 Use current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks to review and tailor training strategies to support the development of literacy skills 3.2 Use current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks to review and tailor assessment strategies to support assessment while maintaining the rigour of the assessment process 3.3 Research, access, review and modify learning resources to support the development of learners with literacy skill support needs 3.4 Research, access, review and modify assessment resources to support the assessment of candidates with literacy skill support needs while maintaining the rigour of the assessment process 3.5 Mentor and provide literacy skill advice to colleagues to support the development of their training and assessment practices
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Participate in professional development activities
4.1 Review own adult literacy professional practice and identify opportunities for improving practice 4.2 Access and interpret current adult literacy research and incorporate findings into own practice 4.3 Interact with professional adult literacy networks to share practice and maintain currency of practice
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TAELLN511 Lead the development of adult literacy skills
About Lesson

Context is King: How Context Affects Literacy Skill Use

Context plays a crucial role in how we utilise literacy skills. Here’s a breakdown of the influence of context on:

 

Linguistic Style and Roles/Relationships:

  • Formal vs. Informal Settings: The formality of the communication environment dictates the language we use. In a work email to a supervisor (formal), the style would differ from a text message to a friend (informal). Literacy skills are used to adapt vocabulary, sentence structure, and tone accordingly.
  • Role-Based Communication: Roles within a workplace or social setting influence communication style. A doctor explaining a diagnosis (professional role) would choose different language and vocabulary than a friend offering emotional support (informal role).

 

Formality and Variables:

  • Age: Younger audiences might understand more informal language, while older populations might prefer a more formal style. Literacy skills are used to adjust communication for different age groups.
  • Role: Similar to above, roles within a situation impact formality. A manager giving instructions (formal) would adopt a different style than colleagues discussing a project (semi-formal).
  • Ethnicity: Cultural backgrounds can influence preferred formality levels. Literacy skills are utilised to navigate these cultural nuances in communication.

 

Example: Writing an email requesting a day off from work would likely be more formal compared to a social media post about weekend plans.

 

Linking Context to Meaning Making:

  • Background Knowledge: Understanding the context is essential for constructing meaning from written or spoken language. Literacy skills help us utilise prior knowledge and information to interpret text or speech accurately.
  • Cultural References: Jokes, idioms, and cultural references rely on shared context for understanding. Literacy skills empower us to interpret these references based on the context provided.
  • Non-verbal Cues: Context includes non-verbal cues like body language and facial expressions. Literacy skills allow us to integrate these cues with written or spoken language for a complete understanding.

 

Example: Reading a news article about a political event requires understanding the broader political context to fully grasp the meaning of the information presented.

 

Proficiency Variations Across Contexts:

People exhibit varying levels of literacy proficiency depending on the context:

  • Domain-Specific Literacy: Some individuals might be highly literate in specific contexts (e.g., technical writing in their field) but struggle with writing in other contexts (e.g., creative writing).
  • Personal vs. Professional: Literacy skills might be more advanced in a familiar personal context compared to a formal professional setting.

 

Example: An engineer might write complex technical reports for work (high proficiency) but struggle with writing a personal narrative for a creative writing class (lower proficiency).

 

Context is a dynamic force that shapes how we use our literacy skills. By understanding the interplay between context and language, we can become more effective communicators, readers, and writers in all areas of life.