Course Content
Advise on literacy demands
1.1 Access nationally recognised training products and analyse their literacy demands using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks 1.2 Analyse literacy demands essential to the workplace context and workplace performance using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks 1.3 Analyse literacy demands of the learning and assessment context using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks 1.4 Share information and provide advice on literacy demands
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Advise on literacy skill support needs of learners
2.1 Collect and analyse information about individual learner and candidate backgrounds to identify strengths and limitations relevant to literacy skill development 2.2 Plan and conduct literacy assessment using validated assessment tasks 2.3 Analyse literacy assessment results using current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks to determine literacy skill levels 2.4 Analyse and compare literacy demands and learner literacy skill levels to determine the literacy skill support needs 2.5 Share information and provide advice on literacy skill assessment, levels and support needs
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Advise on literacy skill development
3.1 Use current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks to review and tailor training strategies to support the development of literacy skills 3.2 Use current authorised Australian foundation skill frameworks to review and tailor assessment strategies to support assessment while maintaining the rigour of the assessment process 3.3 Research, access, review and modify learning resources to support the development of learners with literacy skill support needs 3.4 Research, access, review and modify assessment resources to support the assessment of candidates with literacy skill support needs while maintaining the rigour of the assessment process 3.5 Mentor and provide literacy skill advice to colleagues to support the development of their training and assessment practices
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Participate in professional development activities
4.1 Review own adult literacy professional practice and identify opportunities for improving practice 4.2 Access and interpret current adult literacy research and incorporate findings into own practice 4.3 Interact with professional adult literacy networks to share practice and maintain currency of practice
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TAELLN511 Lead the development of adult literacy skills
About Lesson

Australian Foundation Skills Frameworks and their Use in Describing Vocational Skills

 Australia has thee key frameworks that define foundation skills for adults:

  1. Australian Core Skills Framework (ACSF): This framework focuses on five core skills: learning, reading, writing, oral communication, and numeracy. It describes these skills across five proficiency levels, providing a clear picture of performance at each level in various contexts (personal, community, workplace, and education).
  2. Digital Literacy Skills Framework (DLSF): This framework specifically targets digital literacy skills, outlining the abilities needed to navigate, create, communicate, analyse information, and ensure safety and wellbeing in a digital world. It also utilises a proficiency level approach.
  3. The Core Skills for Work (CSfW) focuses specifically on non-technical skills or employability skills considered essential for successful participation in the workforce, regardless of the specific occupation. It complements the ACSF by delving deeper into workplace-specific skill application.

 

Features of these Frameworks:

  • Proficiency Levels: Both frameworks define skill levels, allowing individuals and workplaces to assess their current competency and identify areas for development.
  • Context-Specificity: These frameworks consider the application of skills in various contexts, making them relevant to understanding vocational skill requirements.
  • Performance Descriptors: Each level within the frameworks outlines specific performance descriptors, which detail the expected skills and behaviours at that level.
  • The CSfW framework additionally outlines a set of nine core skills grouped into three broad categories:
    • Foundational Skills: Learning, Reading, Writing, Oral Communication, and Numeracy (directly aligned with the ACSF).
    • Thinking Skills: Problem Solving, Critical Thinking, and Creativity.
    • Personal Skills: Self-Management, Teamwork, and Workplace Culture.
    • Proficiency Levels:
      • While the CSfW framework doesn’t explicitly define proficiency levels like the ACSF, it describes the development and application of these skills within workplace contexts.

 

Using Frameworks to Describe Vocational Skills:

Here’s how these frameworks can be used to describe the digital literacy, learning, reading, writing, and oral communication skills required for vocational competence: 

  1. Mapping Skills to Job Requirements:
  • Analyse job descriptions and industry standards to identify the specific digital literacy, learning, reading, writing, and oral communication skills required for the role.
  • Map these required skills to the corresponding proficiency levels within the ACSF and DLSF frameworks. This helps define the expected level of competency for each skill.

 

Example: A social media marketing job might require:

 

Using CSfW for Vocational Skills:

Similar to the ACSF and DLSF, the CSfW framework can be used to describe the non-technical skills essential for vocational competence. Here’s how:

  • Identify Required Skills: Analyse job descriptions and industry standards to identify the specific non-technical skills crucial for the role.
  • Map Skills to Framework: Match the required skills to the corresponding skill groups within the CSfW framework (Foundational, Thinking, Personal).
  • Consider Skill Application: Use the CSfW framework’s descriptions to understand how these skills should be applied in a specific workplace context. 

 

Benefits of Using CSfW:

  • Workplace-Specific Focus: Provides a framework specifically tailored to understanding the non-technical skills needed for workplace success.
  • Skill Development Guidance: Helps identify areas where individuals and training programs can focus on developing these employability skills.
  • Complements Other Frameworks: The CSfW framework works in conjunction with the ACSF and DLSF to provide a holistic view of the essential skillsets for vocational competency.

 

Benefits of Using Frameworks in general:

  • Standardised Approach: Provides a consistent way to define and assess foundation skills across different professions.
  • Identifying Skill Gaps: Helps individuals and workplaces identify areas where skill development is needed to meet vocational requirements.
  • Targeted Training: Guides the development of training programs that focus on specific skill development needs aligned with the frameworks.

 

Additional Considerations:

  • While these frameworks provide a strong foundation, specific industries or professions might have additional skill requirements beyond what the frameworks cover.
  • Ongoing technological advancements might necessitate updates to the frameworks to reflect evolving digital literacy skills demands.

 

Remember: The choice of framework or combination of frameworks used will depend on the specific context and the skills being assessed. The CSfW offers valuable insights into the non-technical aspects of vocational competence, complementing the broader skill descriptions provided by the ACSF and DLSF frameworks